1981 - International Year of the Child - Proof Set

In the year 1981 the second commemorative released was to mark the International Year of the Child. There was only Proof Set released and there were no UNC Sets or coins for general circulation. The details are;


Note: Not UNC Set issued.

In the Year 1979 UNSECO declared the year as the “International Year of the Child”. The proclamation was signed on January 1, 1979. Numerous events took place within the UN and in member countries to mark the event.

India and quite a few other countries released a coin in the year 1981 to commemorate the event. The even has many firsts to it.
  • There is only one Pie Fort coin issued in India and its to commemorate the “International Year of Youth”
  • First time a commemorative was released as a Single Coin
  • First time there is no UNC Set
  • First time there are no coins for regular circulation

Proof Set1:
Single Coin of Rs 100 in Pie FortObverse                                                                         Reverse

Proof Set2:
Single Coin of Rs 100 in normal weight.
Obverse                                                                          Reverse






6 comments:

  1. What is the price of 1981 International Year of the Child, Proof coin (normal coin & Pie fort coin with original packing)?
    Are there any other silver coins of post republic India in 90% silver other than this one?

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  2. The Pie fort goes for astronomical sum, must be the highest priced if we discount the National Land Conservation. The last I check some time back it was being quoted more than 1 lacs. The normal one should be in the range of 10 - 20 K.

    The Rs 10 of 1971 Food for All, and the 1969 Gandhi are 80% Silver, 20% Copper. Post this from 1972 all Silver coins are Quantenary Alloy with Silver only 50%, except the 1981.

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  3. I heard that there are people selling duplicates in this 100 rs international year of child proof, is it correct?I also want to know whether there are duplicates in 10 rs , 50 rs , 100rs republic india coins.
    Thank you.

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  4. Well with the price being so high and the demand being high, I would not be surprised if there are Fakes. More so in the recent times the fakes being made in Foreign mints it difficult to distinguish between an Original and Fake. However I have not heard of the 1981 Fake.
    There are Rs 10 fake, not in silver, the most popular being the 1972 Independence Jubilee.

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  5. Can any one tell what is the quantity of both coins minted ?

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  6. This Pie Fort is the only coin - a beautiful one - minted in India and is very very scarcely and rarely available. Demand is much much higher than the supply. Very few coins are left. If someone decides to sell and the purchaser really wants to possess it, the buyer should be ready to pay anything in the region of Rupees Two lakhs in India.

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